Full-timing, insurance, licensing, medical, pets etc
 #142072  by ahobern
 Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:33 pm
Hello,
We are living full time in a custom built ford transit and recently found the upper storage area above the van (see photos) has collected insane amounts of moisture. The storage area isn’t completely sealed as You can see the exposed metal in one of the images. We do not have the battery capacity to run an electric dehumidifier so we are hoping to find either one that you can recharge or that is made with the throw away moisture beads. Any advice is appreciated
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 #142075  by justus
 Sun Jun 24, 2018 4:52 pm
You could try DampRid available M10 Bunnings etc, very effective, non electric :TU
 #145990  by myles
 Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:35 am
Was considering going the silica bead route after spending a week in the snow - with two adults and two dogs in the bus we had moisture in places I wasn't happy having moisture in - however it all dried out once we got home with a bit of help from the sun.

Any way...the following NZ company might be worth considering - lots of different options and silica beads can be rejuvenate by simply heating in an oven:

https://www.silicagelproducts.co.nz/

Our bus has a small area behind the dash that tends to collect a little moisture from condensation from the windscreen - this is what I'm considering using, but haven't quite got to it yet...
 #145994  by Izzle
 Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:18 am
I got a small dehumidifier (9V or 12V) from aliexpress.com . It looks like the Shard in London but only the size of a shoe box.

How well does it work? It is not a refrigerator type so works better when it's not too cold. After a week or so you could feel a difference when you touched things. I use it in the winter when the van is parked up for longer periods, but that also means no moisture input from cooking or people breathing/showering. I was collecting under a cup full daily. But that's better than nothing. It certainly is not as good as a mains refrigerator dehumidifier but was not very expensive either. Perhaps I should have used two.

This is just a thought if you have spare solar power or can connect to the mains (it came with a mains adaptor).

Alan
 #146005  by petercw
 Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:50 am
What about running some 12v computer fans in that area.. They are small and cheap to run..I use one as a xpelair, works very well, and quiet. They will move the air around.. if too noisy for you you can put a resister on it\them.
Got mine on AliExpress.
 #146010  by mattn
 Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:20 am
Dehumidifiers use a lot of power and if on solar are unlikely to be viable unless you have a lot left over at the end of a day. (a small one uses at least 20W, but only extracts a small amount of moisture). Chances are much of the improvement people notice with these small ones more about the air movement they create. The computer fan idea is great - small air movements in a heated van prevent the cold spots that cause condensation.

Better to focus on preventing the moisture in the first place - ventilation, especially in bathrooms and when cooking, as well as good 24/7 ventilation. A key thing is the ability to to open the van up and let it breath while you are away from it, without compromising security. Coming back to a cold dry van and turning heating on for a few minutes is better than coming back to a damp warm van. Take every opportunity you can to replace the air in the van, especially when driving (In winter, the heating of the fresh cold air when driving is free)
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