#99174  by Desultory
 Sat Sep 05, 2015 5:57 pm
For those people wanting to read up more about these new battery types heres some good links with some great information.

I hope this helps a few people.

http://www.batteryuniversity.com/learn/ ... id_systems

http://www.altenergymag.com/content.php ... leadcarbon

And lastly more about help nano-carbon technology is helping with new battery developments:
http://www.technologyreview.com/news/53 ... echnology/


Regards
Steve
 #108814  by neon73
 Wed Feb 24, 2016 12:11 am
Hi just adding to this thread,
Does anyone have these lead carbon battery's ?
how long have you used them ?
what do you think?
thanks
 #144475  by sambaman
 Thu Sep 13, 2018 4:57 pm
Hi folks,

Have any of you that bought lead carbon batteries had the chance to really evaluate if they are any better than normal lead acid deep cycle? I am thinking about getting some for my caravan and would like opinions.

Cheers,
Pat
 #144604  by onPatrol
 Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:35 pm
Yep I've had Lead Carbon for 2 years ([email protected]) running a pure sine inverter running my full size fridge 24 hours a day. The great thing about the Lead Carbon is I don't have to worry at all. Usually I don't go below 80%, but if they do .. no problem .. they handle it fine. These are great batteries.. no worries at all so far.
 #144617  by sambaman
 Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:58 am
Good to know. I take it those are Narada batteries?
What size and type of sine inverter are you using and how much PV?

Thanks again
Pat
 #144730  by RogerNH
 Sat Sep 22, 2018 8:49 pm
With the move towards electric cars, battery technology is advancing rapidly and we will see many changes in the next few years. I have no experience of lead carbon batteries and am unable to comment on their long term life expectancy, but I do note that the weight of them could preclude their use in electric vehicles in the future.
I purchased two Lithium Iron Phosphate (12v 100 amp hour each ) batteries six years ago and installed a cell voltage balancer for them earlier this year. Individual cell voltages are all even and I anticipate I should have many years of life left in them. The cost of these remains high @ $2000+ and so they are more expensive than the Lead carbon ones, which, if they have a similar life expectancy could well be a worthwhile purchase.
I think that in the long run an investment in modern battery technology , whatever the type, will prove to be a much cheaper option. (Incidentally, I changed from lead acid deep cycle batteries after I had ruined my second set in seven years)
Roger H
 #146265  by onPatrol
 Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:06 pm
sambaman wrote:
Tue Sep 18, 2018 8:58 am
Good to know. I take it those are Narada batteries?
What size and type of sine inverter are you using and how much PV?

Thanks again
Pat
Yes I believe they are Narada but not branded that way. I'm using 4x6V in a 24V configuration. 600W PV. 300W pure sinewave inverter. The inverter powers the fridge, 2 laptops and large monitors, and cellphone chargers and the ignitors for the gas hot water cylinder and full size oven
The fridge is a samsung digital inverter type which draws about 130W max (from memory).
Yes I would love Lithium batteries, much lighter, less space required but much much more expensive and you need to be careful with them, otherwise they become expensive junk.
Happy with my setup .. hopefully the Lithium batteries will eventually get cheaper, but I have a number of years before I need to think about that!
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